SURGE Lecture Series

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SURGE 2016 – Sino-US Relations in a Trump Presidency

Tufts SURGE is proud to present its annual fall event. This year, we are pleased to have Robert Ross speak at our event on December 7, 2016, 7pm at the Crane Room, Paige Hall.

Robert Ross is Professor of Political Science at Boston College and Associate, John King Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies, Harvard University. He has testified before Senate and House committees and the Defense Policy Board Advisory Committee, and advises US government agencies on various policy actions. He has written publications, including: Chinese Security Policy: Structure, Power, and Politics, China’s Ascent: Power, Security, and the Future of International Politics, as well as has articles published in Foreign Affairs, Foreign Politics, The China Quarterly.

Dr. Ross will speak about the legacy of President Obama’s Pivot to Asia, before assessing the implications of Donald’s Trump electoral success on future Sino-US relations.


The Rise of Chinese Soft Power – by Wang Guan 11/24/2015The Rise Of China s Soft Power poster-page-001

China’s growing influence in the world is indisputable. In recent years it has used political and economic means to project power in East Asia, Central Asia, and even as far as Africa and Latin America. But how does it employ its soft power- cultural programs, educational exchanges, and new media- to influence other countries? Fletcher China Club, Tufts SURGE and Tufts CSA therefore co-produce The Rise of Chinese Soft Power, with Mr. Wang Guan, Chief Political Correspondent of CCTV America. He will discusses his views on the Rise of China’s Soft Power. The conversation will be honest, open, and “off the record.”


Dialogue with scholars from Peking University: China-Russia Relationship 2/27/2015

In cooperation with EPIIC, SURGE conducted a dialogue with Professor Guihai Guan, Associate Dean, School of International Studies, Peking University about China-Russia relations and how these relations also impact the U.S. In addition to Professor Guihai Guans discussion, two graduate students from Peking University presented their recent research also related to China-Russia relations.


Rise of China – by Professor Michael Beckley 10/28/2014CUS-beckely

Professor Beckley (our wonderful SURGE Advisor) will be discussing why, in his view, the “Rise of China” does not necessarily mean a decline in power for the US. He will argue why resolving the question is crucial for US policy makers in order to effectively plan future decisions regarding US stance towards China, whether through economic constraint, or managing the rise of China via maintaining liberal economic policy. His own research has shown a trend discussing why the rise of China does not spell an end to US dominance, and the relatively beneficial outcomes of the current status quo, and he makes suggestions on how to best formulate US policy towards China based on empirical analysis.


Economic Co-Operation Between China and the U.S. – by Kathleen DeBoer 10/7/201410721215_10203001251299309_1048029814_n

We will be hearing Kathleen DeBoer, Deputy Head of the Organization for Economic Co-Operation and Development’s Washington Center, discuss the increasingly relevant issue of economic cooperation between the US and China. She will be providing insight both through her work with the OECD and her time living and teaching in Nanjing, China.


Voices Behind China’s One-Child PolicyVoice Behind One Child Policy

In the Culture Event hosted in December, SURGE conducted a discussion about the former One-Child Policy in China. We were honored to have Ms. Melissa Ludtke, an award-winning journalist and Yankee Quill Award winner, as our guest speaker. During the event, Ms. Ludtke talked about her book and education series: Touching Home in China, which is a project on the influence of the One-Child Policy, and the experience of her own beloved daughter Maya who was adopted from China. In addition to Ms. Ludtke, Jiahe Chi, a Chinese senior and former member of SURGE, shared his insights on how the policy changed the lifestyle and perspectives of urban and rural populations in China.


Same, Same But Different – Dec. 3rd, 201410687235_307021046169375_8069628181002819209_o

“Same, Same But Different” was held in Olin 11, during open block from 12 to 1pm on Wednesday, December 3rd. Four Chinese and American students who have lived in both China and America shared their experiences dealing with cultural and ideological differences between the two cultures. Their different backgrounds and stories offered insights on various aspects of Eastern and Western cultures, and was inspiring to those who have similar experiences and who are interested in studying abroad.