Business Panel

Innovation: Transformation and Future of China’s Economy

In the past three years, China’s economy has slowed down significantly, and is now facing problems such as increasing labor cost, huge regional debt, unstable stock market, immature regulations and supervisions and so on. Given these challenges, how will China innovate and transform its national economy to keep its growth momentum?

Moderator

图片1

Patrick Schena

Adjunct Assistant Professor, Tufts Fletcher School

Patrick Schena is Adjunct Assistant Professor of International Business Relations at the Fletcher School, Tufts University, where he is also Senior Fellow of the Council on Emerging Market Enterprises and Co-Head of SovereigNet, The Fletcher Network for Sovereign Wealth and Global Capital. In addition, he is an Associate-in-Research at the Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies, Harvard University. Dr. Schena has 30 years experience in finance, operations, consulting, and technology management focused in investment management. He has served in a variety of roles in treasury, investment, and financial management and private equity, as well as in executive positions in finance and operations.  He cofounded and was a member of the executive management team of two successful start-up providers of technology and operations services to investment managers.   He was most recently Principal, leading delivery of the Investment Management Services practice at a Genpact-Headstrong Corp., a global provider of outsourcing services. He holds a PhD in from the Fletcher School, Tufts University and additional graduate degrees from The Fletcher School, and Boston College.

 

Panelists

Coflan

Andrew Coflan

Research Analyst, Rhodium Group

Andrew Coflan is a Research Analyst at Rhodium Group focusing on China’s financial and
macroeconomic reforms. Andrew’s work includes tracking Chinese efforts to implement planned reforms as well as evaluating the potential impact of reforms on the global economy. Other areas of research and publication include China’s changing trade dynamics and their geopolitical implications as well as the political economy of China’s exchange rate policy.

Andrew has previously worked at Frontier Strategy Group, Albright Stonebridge Group, and on the White House National Economic Council. He received a Bachelor of Arts from Georgetown University and a Master’s in International Economics and China Studies from the Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies. Andrew is an alumnus of Teach for China.

 

Manning

Tom Manning

Professor, University of Chicago Law School

Tom Manning is a board director, corporate adviser, educator, and angel investor who previously served as the CEO of companies in Asia, Europe and the United States.

Based in Hong Kong for seventeen years, he served as the CEO of Cerberus Asia, Indachin Limited, Capgemini Asia, and Ernst & Young Global Consulting Asia, and as a partner with Bain & Company.  While with Capgemini, he managed the firm’s Global Strategy & Technology business from Paris.  Earlier in his career, he was with McKinsey & Company, CSC Index, and Buddy Systems in the United States.

He is currently on the adjunct faculty of The University of Chicago Law School, where he teaches courses on corporate governance in China, private equity in Asia, U.S.-China relations, and innovative solutions.  He also serves as an independent board director of three publicly-listed companies:  Dun & Bradstreet, the leading global provider or corporate information (NYSE); CommScope, a leading telecommunications technology company (Nasdaq); and, Clear Media, China’s largest outdoor media management company (HKSE).  He is also an advisory board member of The Demand Institute, an affiliate partner of the Waterstone Management Group, and Chairman of The Chicago Philharmonic Society.  In 2013, he founded The China Advisory Board, a group of China-experienced executives who provide strategic assistance to corporations whose future depends on China.

 

McFarlan

F. Warren McFarlan

 Baker Foundation Professor, Albert H. Gordon Professor of Business Administration

Professor McFarlan earned his AB from Harvard University in 1959, and his MBA and DBA from the Harvard Business School in 1961 and 1965 respectively. He has had a significant role in introducing materials on Management Information Systems to all major programs at the Harvard Business School since the first course on the subject was offered in 1962.

He was Senior Associate Dean and Director of Research from 1991 to 1995, Senior Associate Dean and Director of External Relations from 1995-2000, and Senior Associate Dean and Director of Asia Pacific from 1999-2004. Professor McFarlan was Guest Professor and Co-Director of the Case Development Center at Tsinghua University’s School of Economics and Management from July 1, 2009 to August 31, 2014

Professor McFarlan’s newest book, Can China Lead? Reaching the Limits of Power and Growth, coauthored with Professors Regina M. Abrami and William C. Kirby, was published by HBS Press in February 2014. “Why China Can’t Innovate — What They Are Doing about It,” coauthored with Professors Regina M. Abrami and William C. Kirby, appeared in the March 2014 Harvard Business Review.  “China’s Growing IT Services and Software Industry: Challenges and Implications,” coauthored with Professor Ning Jia and Justin Wong, MIS Quarterly Executive 11, no.1 (March 2012).  Joining a Non-Profit Board: What You Need to Know, coauthored with Professor Marc J. Epstein, appeared in March 2011, published by Jossey-Bass Division of John Wiley.  Chinese General Management: Tsinghua-Harvard Text and Cases, coauthored with Guoqing Chen, appeared in 2009 published by Tsinghua University Press (available in Mandarin only.)  Connecting the Dots, coauthored with Cathleen Benko, was published by HBS Press in 2003.  Corporate Information Strategy and Management: Text and Cases (seventh edition), coauthored with Professors Lynda M. Applegate and Robert D. Austin was  published by McGraw Hill  in 2006. He is editor of Information Systems Research Challenge, published by HBS press in 1984. He served a three-year term as Senior Editor of the MIS Quarterly (1986-1988). He is a member of several corporate and non-profit boards.